The wrong ski boot can lead to debilitating shin and foot pain, which can turn off prospective skiers from the sport. Improper-fitting boots can also increase the chances of ejecting out of your bindings or losing control in dangerous terrain. It’s important to get the right boots, and we’ve collected a list of the very best men’s ski boots for 2023. 

  • Dynafit RADICAL BOOT
  • Atomic HAWX PRIME XTD 100 HT GW
  • Rossignol ALLTRACK ELITE 130 LT GW
  • Rossignol ALLTRACK PRO 110 LT GW
  • Dalbello Panterra 120
  • Dalbello Lupo AX 120
  • Salomon SHIFT PRO 120 AT
  • Salomon S/PRO 120
  • Lange RX 120 GW
  • Lange XT3 FREE 130 MV GW

Dynafit RADICAL BOOT

This contender for best men’s ski boots can do a lot. Billed as a jack of all trades, the RADICAL BOOT can easily hold its own at the resort and in the backcountry. It’s a comfortable and stiff boot overall but won’t fit as well on narrow feet with a wide last width.

  • Flex: 110 (Advanced/Expert)
  • Last width: 103.5 mm
  • Type: Hybrid

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Warm
  • Intuitive walk mode
  • Great power transfer
  • Stiff

Cons

  • The wide profile isn’t for everyone
Brand Name | Product Type

Atomic HAWX PRIME XTD 100 HT GW

This downhill capable but touring pin-compatible option strikes the right balance while delivering a softer flex for newer skiers. The hybrid applicability is a highlight but only matters if you see yourself splitting about half your time between in-bounds and out-of-bounds terrain.

  • Flex: 100 (Intermediate/Advanced)
  • Last Width: 100 mm
  • Type: Hybrid

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Good all-around performance
  • Good for a wider range of ability levels
  • Excellent downhill support

Cons

  • Not stiff enough for aggressive skiers
Brand Name | Product Type

Rossignol ALLTRACK ELITE 130 LT GW -SAND

This downhill capable but touring pin-compatible option strikes the right balance while delivering a softer flex for newer skiers. The hybrid applicability is a highlight but only matters if you see yourself splitting about half your time between in-bounds and out-of-bounds terrain.

  • Flex: 100 (Intermediate/Advanced)
  • Last Width: 100 mm
  • Type: Hybrid

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Superior downhill performance
  • Can support aggressive skiing
  • Compatible with a wide range of bindings
  • Warm and comfortable

Cons

  • Stiff and limited range of motion on long uphill skinning journeys
Brand Name | Product Type

Rossignol ALLTRACK PRO 110 LT GW - Black

With a more forgiving flex than its cousin, the Elite 130, this model satisfies a large range of ability levels. Expert skiers may find the relaxed flex a little too soft, but for the majority of skiers, this is a great boot. The boot is warm and comfortable as well.

  • Flex: 110 (Advanced)
  • Last Width: 100 mm
  • Type: Hybrid

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Warm
  • Handles variable conditions well
  • Great for on-piste and off-piste performance
  • Very comfortable

Cons

  • These wider boots have a lot of appeal but won’t feel the best on narrower feet
Brand Name | Product Type

Dalbello Panterra 120 GW

For the resort-focused skier who likes to occasionally venture to some walk-to terrain, the Dalbello Panterra 120 is a solid choice for someone looking for the best men’s ski boots. The flex is aggressive, so you can charge hard, and the on-piste performance is second to none. 

Aside from quick forays into the sidecountry, this boot is heavy and less appealing for longer touring adventures with frequent or longer duration uphill sections.

  • Flex: 120 (Advanced/Expert)
  • Last Width: 102 mm
  • Type: Downhill w/ limited hiking capability

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Stiff flex for aggressive skiing
  • Great on-piste performance
  • All-mountain appeal
  • Can handle walk-to terrain

Cons

  • Not much extended backcountry or touring appeal
Brand Name | Product Type

Dalbello Lupo AX 120 AT

This crossover boot is perfect for dabbling in both frontcountry and backcountry areas. Unlike the Panterra 120, the fit is stiff but has plenty of room for adjustments. This is a great boot for someone who skis up to 50 days a season, but the durability isn’t the greatest for people who ski more than that.

  • Flex: 120 (Advanced/Expert)
  • Last Width: 100 mm
  • Type: Touring boot with hybrid appeal

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Can handle off-piste and piste-terrain
  • Stiff flex for aggressive skiers
  • Feels light on the uphill
  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Durability issues over time with consistent skiing
Brand Name | Product Type

Salomon SHIFT PRO 120 AT

These one-quiver solution all-mountain ski boots are great for someone who wants one boot that can handle most conditions they’ll encounter in any given winter. The stiff flex also allows for aggressive skiing when the occasion strikes while maintaining a light and supportive feel.

  • Flex: 120 (Advanced/Expert)
  • Last Width: 100 mm
  • Type: Hybrid

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Great for aggressive skiers
  • Nimble alpine touring mobility
  • Very Comfortable
  • Useful walk mode

Cons

  • Relatively limited range of motion for a touring capable boot
Brand Name | Product Type

Salomon S/PRO 120

This highly versatile top performer is great for myriad conditions on the slopes. There is no walk mode, and the wide last width makes it better for larger feet. However, the S/PRO can absolutely shred and is a fantastic all-around pick for hard-chargers at resorts and ski hills.

  • Flex: 120 (Advanced/Expert)
  • Last Width: 106 mm
  • Type: Downhill

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Heat moldable liner
  • Lightweight
  • Stiff flex for aggressive skiers
  • Responsive
  • Comfortable

Cons

  • No walk setting
  • Not for narrow feet
Brand Name | Product Type

Lange RX 120 GW

Lange makes excellent ski boots with a narrower foot profile. These are performance-focused, on-piste boots. If you’re ready to push the envelope and tackle steeps, trees, bumps and everything in between, a Lange boot will serve you well. 

  • Flex: 120 (Advanced/Expert)
  • Last Width: 100 mm
  • Type: Downhill

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Great performance-oriented boot
  • Superior downhill stability
  • Capable in a wide variety of conditions
  • Very responsive

Cons

  • Not for intermediate skiers or those with wider feet
  • Not very warm
Brand Name | Product Type

Lange XT3 FREE 130 MV GW

These downhill-oriented but fully capable backcountry boots are a great, aggressive solution to long winter days. The downhill support is awesome, but the uphill movement is a bit cumbersome. This boot is best for long days at a resort or shorter backcountry adventures with an emphasis on skiing big aggressive lines.

  • Flex: 130
  • Last Width: 100 mm
  • Type: Hybrid

Price: 0.00$

Pros

  • Excellent support
  • Performance-oriented
  • Still flex for aggressive skiers
  • Compatible with a lot of binding options

Cons

  • Heavy
Brand Name | Product Type

Buying Guide

Before settling on a pair of ski boots, take a look at some of the points below to make sure you’re getting the best men’s ski boots for your needs. For more advice, visit our companion article on how to choose ski boots.

Type of Boot

There are a few varieties of men’s ski boots out there. For those who want to spend most or all of their time at resorts, it makes sense to buy a downhill-focused boot. The boots may be a bit heavier than other options, but that is less of an issue because you’ll be using chairlifts.

Alpine touring boots are specialized boots that fit into tech bindings for use in the backcountry. Hybrid boots represent the best of both worlds and can operate seamlessly in both. Hybrid boots are designed to fit a wider variety of bindings and setups.

Types of Boots for Skiing Level

If you’re a beginner or lower intermediate skier, the best boot to get is a downhill-focused boot with a softer flex. A good range is from 80-100. The stiffer the flex, the more uncomfortable the boot and the harder it will be to control. For those still mastering the art of skiing, it helps to increase your proficiency in an area that’s avalanche controlled, patrolled and has ski lifts.

Advanced skiers and expert skiers hunting for the best men’s ski boots will want a stiffer flex boot. A great range is from roughly 100-130. In this range, you’ll be able to ski aggressively on many different slopes without fearing that your boot won’t support you. Higher-level skiers are also more likely to look at hybrid and alpine touring boots to increase their skiing exploration.

Types of Flex

Flex is a measurement of how easy or difficult it is to push against the liner of your boot. A lower flex means a lot more flexibility, which makes it easier to turn and maneuver at lower speeds. However, when you start going faster, a softer flex can feel unsupportive, which will affect your body position and could lead to injury. Expert skiers will want a stiff flex.

In general, flex ratings are measured numerically and follow a few ranges. Beginner flex boots run from roughly 60-90. Intermediate boots can run from 80-110. Advanced ski boots run from roughly 100-120, and expert boots have a flex from 120-140. The categories do overlap a bit, and boots in those areas can work for multiple ability levels while staying supportive. 

Boot Length

When searching for the best men’s ski boots, size matters; anything too big or small will create uncomfortable sensations and may lead to pain. Ski sizes also change depending on where you are skiing.

Ski boot length relies on a system called mondopoint. It was developed to take different sizing scales from different countries and create a universal standard. 

To find your mondopoint, measure your foot from heel to toe in cm. An easy method is to stand on a piece of paper, trace your foot length with a pencil, then measure the line. Ski boot sizes should be written on the outside of the cuff of the boot you’re looking at. 

Boot Width

The last width is a measurement of the forefoot of the boot. It’s important because it’ll tell you what type of foot the boot accommodates. A last width under 100 mm will fit average and narrow feet. A last width over 100 mm is designed to support people with wider feet.

Boot Fit

The best men’s ski boots should fit snugly. You should be able to tighten the boot without cutting off circulation or experiencing pain. Your heel, once set in the boot, should not be able to move. If it does, the boot may be too big. Conversely, if you can’t even wiggle your toes and your foot feels consistently cold, the boot is too small.

FAQ

Q: Which 2023 ski boot is best?

A: The answer will depend on your style of skiing (piste, off-piste, touring etc.) and your ability level. A softer flex is more comfortable but less beneficial for aggressive skiing.

Q: Is it better to size up or down in ski boots?

A: It’s better to size up when hunting for the best men’s ski boots. You can always add inserts or insoles to reduce excess space.

Q: What are the different ski boot types?

A: There are downhill-specific ski boots that operate best on-piste and alpine touring boots that operate best on long backcountry adventures. There are also hybrid boots that can handle both situations but won’t be as light as touring boots or as sturdy as downhill boots.

Conclusion

Finding the best men’s ski boots means finding comfort and precision. Armed with one of the best men’s ski boots, even rental skis become easier to handle. These important pieces of equipment can be the difference between the limitless potential of skiing and the discomfort that convinces you to try something else.